P3 Science and Maths – Wednesday 6 May

Today we are going to combine science and maths!

For this activity, you will need the table you created last week. Hopefully you have managed to record the parts of a plant you have eaten over the last 7 days.

Your first task is to add up your ticks or tally marks in each column so that you have a total for each of the parts of a plant. Write the total at the bottom of the column.

For example: (this is not my chart – just one I have made up as an example.)

 SeedRootStemFlowerFruitLeaves
Pumpkin seedsIII     
Apple    IIII 
Banana    III 
Sunflower seedsI     
Radish II    
Celery  II   
Carrot III    
Broccoli   III  
Lettuce     II
       
Total462372

Now you will need to think back to your previous learning to help you make a bar chart using the data you have recorded.

Remember, your bar chart should include:

  • A title
  • A label for the x axis (the one that goes along the bottom)
  • A label for the y axis (the one that goes up and down)
  • Words along the x-axis (showing parts of the plant)
  • Numbers going up the y-axis (to show the number eaten)

DON’T FORGET TO USE A RULER!

Here is my chart based on the the data I recorded from 28 April until 5 May:

Compare my chart with yours and answer the following questions in your jotter. (Remember to write today’s date and a title.)

I have written some challenge questions in red. These are optional.

  1. Have a look at the charts. Why is it useful to have information given to us in a graph? (Compare what the information looks like in a graph with how it looked in the chart.)
  2. Which part of the plant did I eat most often? How many times did I eat it? (Remember to read the numbers – don’t count lines.)
  3. Which part of the plant did you eat most often? How many times did you eat it?
  4. Which part of the plant did I eat least? How many times did I eat it?
  5. Which part of the plant did you eat least? How many times did you eat it?
  6. How many times did I eat a plant root last week?
  7. How many times did I eat a flower?
  8. What reasons can you think of for why we might have eaten much more of one part of the plant than another part of a plant?
  9. What is the difference (in the number of times eaten) between the part of the plant I ate most of and the part of the plant I ate least?
  10. What is the difference (in the number of times eaten) between the part of a plant you ate the most of and the part of the plant you ate least?
  11. How many more times did I eat fruit compared with seeds?
  12. How many fewer times did I eat the stem of a plant compared with leaves?
  13. How many times did I eat parts of a plant altogether last week?
  14. How many times did you eat parts of a plant last week?
  15. What is the difference between the two figures you have worked out in the two questions above?
  16. How many times did you and I eat parts of a plant altogether last week?
  17. If I had eaten seeds twice as many times last week, how many times would I have eaten them?
  18. If I had eaten four times as many leaves as is shown on my chart, how many times would I have eaten them? How would this change a key piece of information my chart shows? (Hint: what can you say about fruit in my chart above?)
  19. If I had included drinks in my chart, leaves would be the highest bar. Have a think about what some adults drink (especially because I am at home all day) and write down why this might be.

Watch this interesting clip to help you answer Q17. After watching, write down three things that surprised you or that you learned. Alternatively discuss this with someone at home.

From our activity last week, it is clear to see that humans depend on plants for food.

Over the next week, I’d like you to find out some other uses for plants (we will be looking at the way plants help us survive later on, so please focus on the way people use plants, for this activity).

Explaining what you have found out to someone else will help you remember what you have learned. You could do this through a discussion with a family member, by making a colourful poster and explaining it, by recording yourself explaining your facts, by making a PowerPoint and giving a presentation etc. Alternatively, you might get creative and make up a song, a dance or use a drama technique . You choose!

If you find any amazing facts along the way, please e-mail them in and I’ll share them on the site. Parents: please let me know if you are happy for me to share who the fact came from (I would only use a first name).

Here are some links to get you started:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/clips/zfjd7ty

https://www.factmonster.com/dk/encyclopedia/science/plant-products

https://schoolgardening.rhs.org.uk/resources/Info-Sheet/Plants-in-our-daily-life

Happy fact-finding!