Category Archives: P3C-Blog

Learning Together at Home: 30.03.2020

Hello everyone! I hope you had a lovely weekend 😊 I managed a massive group Skype call with some friends. We were calling each other from four different countries all at the same time! I also went for a lovely walk in the sunshine yesterday and ate some delicious dinners.

If you are looking to help out with the cooking at home, you could try one of Jamie Oliver’s Cooking with Kids videos. There’s a whole lot on YouTube here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLcpoB2VESJme7lSxXEcXyVtFPsMI78lcL

As always, please get in touch via the school email system if you have any questions, comments or need any clarification. The email address is: Admin@buckstone.edin.sch.uk

Literacy: spelling

Copy out your spelling words.

This week’s spelling rule is looking at the short vowel sound o when it is immediately before the l sound. It sounds like it should be ol but it is instead spelt al. So we have salt not solt. This follows when it is a double l  as well so small not smoll. Can you think of any other words that are in the all word family?

This week’s tricky words are also and always.

Check any unknown words in the dictionary or by asking someone at home what they mean.

Practice your spelling words one of the suggestions on your spelling homework grid. I have posted a picture of the grid in case anyone is needing it.

Word list:

  • salt
  • halt
  • bald
  • scald
  • altar
  • wall
  • calling
  • small
  • stall
  • football
  • also
  • always

Challenge list:

  • halted
  • balding
  • scalded
  • altered
  • exalting
  • nightfall
  • bookstall
  • overall
  • volleyball
  • waterfall
  • also
  • always

Literacy: reading

Red Dragons, Orange Charzards and Yellow Pikachus, you should all have a non-fiction book included in your packs as one of your reading books.

Red Dragons – Blast Off to the Moon!

Orange Charzards – I’ve Just Had a Bright Idea!

Yellow Pikachus – Let’s Go To Mars!

Green Turtles and Blue Eagles, please can you find a non-fiction book to read from around the house or use the Oxford Owl website to find a free e-book to read this week.

From this link https://www.oxfordowl.co.uk/for-home/find-a-book/library-page/# choose the book type tab and then select non-fiction. You will need to create an account, but I understand this is free at the moment. (As a side note, their website has lots of helpful resources for parents).

Audible are also offering free kids audiobooks at the moment. You will need to create an account and download the app but they also have plenty of non-fiction options available.

Before you start reading, think about and discuss with a grown up:

  • Look at the front cover and read the title. Check the meaning of any unknown or tricky words. What do you think the book will be about? How many words can you think of that go with the topic? (for example: if your book is about space – solar system, universe, galaxy, planets, moon, rockets, Milky Way, astronauts etc.)
  • Find the glossary in the book. Where was it? What information does a glossary give you? How might you use it when you are reading?
  • Do you need to read this book in order? Why or why not?

While you are reading, think about and discuss with a grown up:

  • Does this book remind you of anything else you have read? (Fiction or non-fiction)
  • Does this make sense? Do you believe what you are reading?
  • What questions does this book prompt? Do you want to find out more information about a topic?
  • Is the layout different to a fiction book? Why do you think they have chosen to do this?
  • Can you explain what you have read to another person without looking back at the book?

When you are finished reading, answer these comprehension questions in your jotter using full sentences:

  • Who is the author of this book?
  • List 3 new facts you learnt.
  • Why do non-fiction books need a glossary?
  • Did you find this book interesting? Why or why not?
  • How could you make this book better?
  • Make a poster that summarises the key facts or information you learnt from this book.

Please note this does not need to be completed all at once but could be spread out over a couple of days. Challenge yourself by reading more than one non-fiction book.

Maths: core numeracy

This week I will be posting activities that aim to develop the children’s core numeracy skills. Please also keep practising those times tables!

Daily 10 warm-up

Another way I sometimes start a maths lesson is by looking at a number of the day and asking the children to complete different sums starting with that number. Each sum should always start with the number in the middle. For example: 17 + 10 = ? but then the next sum would also start with 17 so 17 + 12 = ?. I have posted two options.

Today’s core numeracy is looking at number ordering. Ordering numbers means putting a selection of random numbers in the correct order either from smallest to largest or round the other way. This strengthens understanding of place value and is essential for understanding the connection between numbers. Please choose a chilli level to work through at a pace that works for your child.

Mild:

Use a 100 square to find numbers. The children should point to the number as you say them. You can find a 100 square either in your home learning pack or online here: https://www.topmarks.co.uk/learning-to-count/paint-the-squares

47        28        39        12        48        55        81        63        99        75        79        36        45

Count forwards and backwards within 100. In class I would give the children a number to start on and they would then count on until I asked them to stop. It is important that these sequences of numbers cross decades (18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23). Often the children struggle with numbers above 40 and will make mistakes like 48, 49, 60, 61, 62. They generally find counting backwards more difficult, so I would usually spend more time on counting backwards. Ask the children to count out loud from:

  • 17 to 24                      
  • 38 to 46
  • 63 to 75
  • 89 to 99
  • 23 to 15
  • 36 to 27
  • 55 to 41
  • 88 to 74

These are just examples. Please repeat with different sets of numbers until you feel your child is counting confidently.

Ordering numbers within 100. In class I would set out a range of digit cards (just cards with different numbers on them) and ask the children to move the cards into the correct order (either smallest to largest or largest to smallest). At home you could write numbers on post it notes or just write them on a piece of paper and ask your child to write them in the correct order. Make sure some of the ordering is going from largest to smallest.

Put these numbers in order (a sequence of numbers):

  1. 28        26        29        27        30
  2. 50        47        51        49        48
  3. 90        93        89        92        91

Put these numbers in order (random selection):

  1. 33        39        26        19        21
  2. 77        93        65        48        81
  3. 62        97        28        14        71

Again, these are just examples. Please repeat with different sets of numbers as necessary until you feel your child is confident.

Written consolidation. When your child is feeling confident, have a go at this worksheet.

Online practice: https://www.topmarks.co.uk/ordering-and-sequencing/caterpillar-ordering

In Caterpillar Ordering choose the ‘ordering’ option then choose ether forwards 1-100 or backwards 100-1.

Hot:

Use a 100 square to find numbers. The children should point to the number as you say them. You can find a 100 square either in your home learning pack or online here: https://www.teacherled.com/iresources/hundredsquareadvanced/ . The online 100 square can be changed to look at larger numbers. Set it so it showing numbers between 341 and 440 then find:

372      421      392      418      365      437      381      350      412      376      367

If you do not have access to the online hundred square, use your paper copy in your home learning pack to find:    

47        28        39        12        48        55        81        63        99        75        79        36        45

Count forwards and backwards within 100 – 1000 on the hundred and the decade. In class I would give the children a number to start on and they would then count on either in 100s or in 10s until I asked them to stop. For example, start on 20 and count on in 10s so the children would say 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70. It is important to cross the hundreds (70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120). They generally find counting backwards more difficult, so I would usually spend more time on counting backwards. Ask the children to count out loud from:

  • 70 to 120 in 10s
  • 30 to 80 in 10s
  • 160 to 240 in 10s
  • 300 to 800 in 100s
  • 90 to 10 in 10s
  • 140 to 80 in 10s
  • 210 to 170 in 10s
  • 700 to 100 in 100s

These are just examples. Please repeat with different sets of numbers until you feel your child is counting confidently.

Ordering numbers within 100 – 1000. In class I would set out a range of digit cards (just cards with different numbers on them) and ask the children to move the cards into the correct order (either smallest to largest or largest to smallest). At home you could write numbers on post it notes or just write them on a piece of paper and ask your child to write them in the correct order. Make sure some of the ordering is going from largest to smallest as well as smallest to largest.

Put these numbers in order (10s and 100s):

  1. 900      700      200      100      500      400      1000
  2. 620      610      670      650      700      680      640
  3. 450      330      360      470      320      420      490

Put these numbers in order (random selection):

  1. 44        632      501      199      378
  2. 201      905      98        410      276
  3. 900      243      187      772      550
  4. 321      76        109      838      888

Again, these are just examples. Please repeat with different sets of numbers as necessary until you feel your child is confident.

Written consolidation. When your child is feeling confident, have a go at this worksheet.

Online practice: http://www.ictgames.com/mobilePage/countingCaterpillar/index.html

You can practice ordering a set of 5 random numbers. You can change your minimum and maximum numbers to be a suitable challenge. I would recommend a minimum of 50 and a maximum of 250 to start with then adjust to make it harder as necessary.

Spicy:

Use a 100 square to find numbers. The children should point to the number as you say them. You can find a 100 square either in your home learning pack or online here: https://www.teacherled.com/iresources/hundredsquareadvanced/ . The online 100 square can be changed to look at larger numbers. Set it so it showing numbers between 341 and 440 then find:

372      421      392      418      365      437      381      350      412      376      367

If you do not have access to the online hundred square, use your paper copy in your home learning pack to find:    

47        28        39        12        48        55        81        63        99        75        79        36        45

Count forwards and backwards within 100 – 1000. In class I would give the children a number to start on and then ask them to say the next 3 numbers either after or before my starting number. For example, start on 379 and say the next three numbers after it so the children would say 379, 380, 381, 382. It is important to cross the decades (249, 250, 251, 251) and listen for mistakes like 250, 270, 271.  They generally find counting backwards more difficult, so I would usually spend more time on counting backwards. Ask the children to say:

  • 3 numbers after 148
  • 3 numbers after 289
  • 3 numbers before 321
  • 3 numbers before 872
  • 3 numbers before 941
  • 3 numbers before 652

These are just examples. Please repeat with different sets of numbers until you feel your child is counting confidently.

Ordering numbers within 100 – 1000. In class I would set out a range of digit cards (just cards with different numbers on them) and ask the children to move the cards into the correct order (either smallest to largest or largest to smallest). At home you could write numbers on post it notes or just write them on a piece of paper and ask your child to write them in the correct order. Make sure some of the ordering is going from largest to smallest as well as smallest to largest.

Put these numbers in order (10s and 100s):

  1. 900      700      200      100      500      400      1000
  2. 620      610      670      650      700      680      640
  3. 450      330      360      470      320      420      490

Put these numbers in order (random selection):

  1. 44        632      501      199      378
  2. 201      905      98        410      276
  3. 900      243      187      772      550
  4. 321      76        109      838      888

Again, these are just examples. Please repeat with different sets of numbers as necessary until you feel your child is confident.

Written consolidation. When your child is feeling confident, have a go at this worksheet.

Online practice: http://www.ictgames.com/mobilePage/countingCaterpillar/index.html

You can practice ordering a set of 5 random numbers. You can change your minimum and maximum numbers to be a suitable challenge. I would recommend a minimum of 100 and a maximum of 500 to start with then adjust to make it harder as necessary.

Extra challenge: numeral problem solving

PE

I hope you are enjoying Joe Wick’s daily PE lessons.

If you are looking for alternatives, you could try:

Cosmic Yoga https://www.youtube.com/user/CosmicKidsYoga

Go Noodle https://www.youtube.com/user/GoNoodleGames

Just Dance https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0Vlhde7N5uGDIFXXWWEbFQ/featured

Health and Wellbeing: goal setting

As part of our current whole school Building Resilience programme we have been working on setting goals in class. Our most recent one focussed on choosing a times table to learn.

Talk with someone at home about what you would like to learn or get better at and then set a goal for the week (or just today). You could choose from the list of suggestions below or come up with your own, much better idea.

  • learn or get faster at a particular times table
  • read a chapter book in a week
  • use the French/German word/phrase of the week every day
  • learn a new fact every day
  • be active for 30 minutes every day
  • draw for 30 minutes every day
  • learn how to draw/make something new
  • carry out a science experiment (ask first!)
  • try something you have never done before
  • clean your teeth every day without being asked
  • set the table every day without being asked

My goal for the week is to bake something new that I have never tried before.

Apologies for the super long blog post! I just want to reassure you, the reading task should be split over a couple of days (maybe read today, discussing the before you read and while you read questions but then answer the comprehension questions tomorrow).

You should be choosing just one set of chilli challenge tasks to complete not working your way through all three of them. Most of the task focuses on discussing and ordering numbers and should be completed at a pace that works for your child. Please don’t feel the need to move on to the next task if your child is struggling with the first task, just focus on that task, completing more examples as necessary. I have included 3 tasks in each chilli challenge to show the progression of thinking.

As always, please get in touch if you have any questions 🙂

Learning Together at Home: 27.03.2020

Friday! We made it through week one of Learning Together at Home, congratulations!

Glasgow Science Centre are doing a daily video of science experiments you can do at home or watch (and make predictions) along with them. Check them out here: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23GSCAtHome

Literacy: spelling

On Friday’s we do a spelling dictation (the children love it!) to see how we’ve got on with learning our words. I usually offer a choice of levels. Mild and hot are suitable for those working on the word list. Spicy is for those working on the challenge word list. All three levels should include the tricky words. Ask someone to read out the dictation for you while you write it in your jotter. Remember to write any corrections three times.

Mild:

once, upon, want, wash, wasp, warm, swap

Hot:

Once upon a time there was a war in the swamp. I want to wash my hands.

Spicy:

Once upon a time I was wandering through the forest. I swapped my wardrobe for wallpaper because I was sick of always washing my clothes.

Maths: multiplication games

Prove you know your times tables facts by playing some multiplication games.

Kaboom! (You could make your own using paper or card if you don’t have popsicle sticks)

Multiplication hopscotch (see photo in yesterday’s blog post)

Multiplication war: (2 players)

  • Either take the face cards out or assign them as Ace = 1, Jack = 11, Queen = 12, King = 13
  • Split the deck of cards into two piles
  • At the same time, each player turns over a card
  • Multiply the two numbers together
  • Whichever player says the correct answer first gets to keep the cards
  • You win the game when you have all the cards
8 x 10 = ? Whoever says the answer first adds the two cards to the bottom of their pile

Multiplication wall: (2+ players) – thank you to Callie for the idea!

  • On post it notes, write out answers to various times tables and pop them on a wall
  • Have someone read out sums while you race to find the correct answer first

Make your own multiplication board game. I have attached some templates for ideas or create your own!

Online:

https://www.arcademics.com/ – Scroll down and choose a game from the multiplication section

http://www.ictgames.com/mobilePage/index.html – Choose maths games then scroll down to find the multiplication and division games

https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/hit-the-button – choose times tables

https://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/mental-maths-train – choose multiplication

https://www.educationcity.com/ – login details for P3C should have come out via email yesterday afternoon. Apologies to anyone who tried to access yesterday, it did not appear to sync properly but I believe I have fixed it now. There are two sets of ‘classwork’ available for P3. One is focused on times table and the other is some money revision activities. Please see my email yesterday for more details.

French will be coming on a separate blog post.

Thank you to everyone who sent photos of what they have been getting up to!

Remember to look after and be kind to everyone at home. Stay safe and I hope you have a lovely weekend everyone. See you Monday 😊

French Friday P3 27.3.20

Quel temps fait-il? ( What is the weather like?)

We have been learning to talk about the weather in French.  Have a look at these phrases, practise saying them out loud. Can you remember the mimes we made up to go with them?

il fait beau – it is fine

il fait mauvais – it is nasty

il fait chaud – it is hot

il fait froid – it is cold

il fait gris – it is cloudy

il pleut- it is raining

il neige – it is snowing

il y a du soleil – it is sunny

il y a du vent – it is windy

Have a look at this video to help you with pronunciation.

Afterwards, take a blank page in your jotter and fold it in half, draw a line down the fold. Half way down your page use a ruler to draw a line across your page. Your page should now be split into four quarters. Choose four of the phrases above, write them in each box and draw a picture to illustrate the phrase.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwiv7uvpibjoAhVsQkEAHUhLCEEQyCkwAHoECA0QBA&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DeBvJVOuBPXI&usg=AOvVaw2kvY0gvAO7ubUkxGzrny6b

Learning Together at Home: 26.03.2020

Good morning! Did you know the Lourve Museum and a whole lot of other places are offering virtual tours? Check out some of the options here: https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/life/travel/a31784720/best-virtual-tours/

Thinking back to some of our artist talks: you can see some of Jackson Pollock’s work on the Guggenheim website, Monet on the MoMA (Museum of Modern Art) website and Frida Kahlo on the Detroit Institute of Arts website.

Literacy: spelling

Choose a challenge (preferably different to yesterday’s):

Practice your spelling words using one of the ways on your spelling homework grid.

Apply your understanding by writing a story using every one of your spelling words or by creating an acrostic poem of some of your spelling words.

Extend your learning by completing a thesaurus challenge (find three words that mean the same thing for each of your spelling words) or an antonym challenge (find a word that means the opposite of each spelling word)

Literacy: reading

Today’s reading comprehension looks at a short piece of non-fiction text about sharks. Read the text carefully then answer the questions in your jotter using full sentences and giving quality answers. Remember to include the magic word because if you are giving your opinion (questions 5 & 6).

Maths: multiplication

Daily 10 warm-up. Either choose one of the chilli challenges below or work on the table you have chosen to learn at the moment.

Mild: level 2 – multiplication – mixed tables x2, 5, 10

Hot: level 4 – multiplication – mixed tables x 3, 4, 8

Spicy: level 6 – multiplication – mixed tables up to x12

Another way you can practise your chosen times table is making up a multiplication hopscotch. As you jump in each square, say the answer. Mix up the order to make it more challenging for yourself!

Written consolidation:

So far this week you have hopefully practised your times tables through different activities and worksheets looking at fact families and missing number sums. Today I would like you to apply your knowledge of your times tables to word problems.

Mild: Word problems only using x2, x5 and x10

Hot: Word problems using x2, x3, x4 and x5

Spicy: Word problems using bigger numbers. The group who worked with me last week multiplying by 20, 30, 40 and 50 should have a go at these sums but of course anyone can choose the spicy challenge if they feel able to. When multiplying by bigger numbers, remember to split into numbers that are easier to multiply by. For example; for 16 x 7, split the 16 into 10 and 6, work out 10 x 7 and 6 x 7 then add those two answers together.

Extra challenge: Make up your own word problems for someone else to solve. You can make these as hard as you like but remember that you have to know the answer as well!

Music

We have been learning a variety of songs with Mary from NYCoS on Tuesday afternoons. Have a go at teaching one of the songs to someone at home. Some of our favourites have been the hello song, starlight, starbright and Kye Kye Kule. You could also check out the NYCoS website where they are posting a song a day. https://www.nycos.co.uk/daily-activities

Please let me know if you have any difficulty accessing or downloading the word problem worksheets as I can post pictures of them if necessary. I am experimenting with what is the easiest way to share work on the blog and would appreciate any feedback!

Thank you to those that have been in touch with photos of what you’re all getting up to 🙂 It has made my day!

See you tomorrow

RME P3 26.3.20

We are planning on looking at weddings – the differences in customs and traditions of different religions. Today’s focus is on the traditions surrounding a Jewish wedding. Watch the short film below and if you wish you can write answers to the questions in your jotter or if you prefer, talk about your answers with  someone at home.

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=sarah+and+peter+wedding

  1. Do the bride and groom have their first receptions together or in separate rooms?
  2. When the contract is signed, what do the mothers of the bride and groom do?
  3. Why do they do this?
  4. What does the bride sit on at her reception?
  5. To show that the groom doesn’t just care about the bride’s appearance but about the whole person what does he cover her face with before the wedding ceremony?
  6. The wedding ceremony takes place under a canopy- what is this called?
  7. Why are the sides of the chupa left open?
  8. What is the last part of the ceremony?
  9. What happens in the dancing part of the wedding reception?
  10. On a blank page in your jotter, draw your own picture of the chupa. Remember to decorate it and make it colourful. If you are able, have a look at google images to see examples of other chupas.

P3 Science

We have been learning about forces and you were keen to find out more about gravity. It’s quite a tricky concept and you are likely to have lots of questions once you understand it a little bit.

Some of you have had a bit of an introduction to gravity already, but we can all watch this short video either as a starting point or as a bit of revision.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zf66fg8/articles/zqbm3k7

So we know that the force of gravity on Earth, pulls objects towards it’s centre. That’s why we don’t float about the place!

Activity 1

With permission from someone at home, go and get two (unbreakable) objects of different weights / sizes. You are going to hold them up at the same height and then let them drop at the same time.

Before you do this, predict which object will reach the ground first. Why do you think this?

Try this with other objects. Do you get the same result? Do your results surprise you? What do you think might be going on?

Watch this clip for an explanation:

I imagine you can think of times when something has taken a bit longer to reach the ground. For example, a feather might swing from side to side or when you blow a bubble, it might float around before landing.

Let’s have a look at the concept of air resistance.

Activity 2

Go and get two pieces of paper. Scrunch one up into a ball and leave the other one flat.

Repeat your experiment from activity one. Before you drop the items, predict what you think might happen. Why do you think that?

Now have a look at this clip that talks about friction (which we know a bit about already) and air resistance. Once you have watch it, see if you can explain what happened when you dropped the two pieces of paper to someone in your family.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/clips/zfqw2hv

Activity 3 (Optional!)

We have learned a bit about gravity and air resistance. This helps us understand how parachutes work and why they are used.

Perhaps someone at home could work with you to design and construct your own parachutes for small figures you may have at home. Do this using materials you already have lying around the house. You could test these to see who has built the best one!

There are loads of questions to ask about gravity. If you would like to do your own research, check out some of the following resources:

https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/what-is-gravity/en/

https://www.ducksters.com/science/gravity.php